Coily Manifesto: I Don’t Have The Time

Coily Manifesto: I Don’t Have The Time.

I decided to share the link above because I agree with most of what it has to say. I often lead a fairly busy life which means that I don’t have the time or the inclination to spend hours on my hair. A lot of people think that I do though, because of all its coils and they think it’s thick, coarse and hard to handle, which couldn’t be further from the truth. It would be more difficult if I were to handle it as you would straight hair, which I’ve learned not to do. Let me breakdown the list of things that I won’t do that the link mentions, while adding a couple of more things:

Pre-pooing

I’ve never understood the point of this. Supposedly, some women do it so that their hair doesn’t get stripped as much when they shampoo. Pre-pooing for the uninitiated, involves applying some oil and/or honey and conditioner to your hair, letting the mixture sit for awhile, then rinsing and shampooing. Shampoos (particularly those containing sulfates) strip your hair of all its natural oils, leaving it extremely dry and prone to matting, which is why it’s recommended that those with curly and kinky hair don’t use them.  However, I view pre-pooing as a waste of resources and time because whatever oils get stripped away from shampooing can always be put back in by using, guess what? Conditioner. That’s why it was invented to begin with. I don’t see the point in prolonging the washing process a few minutes by pre-pooing when I can just let the conditioner soak in my hair while I do other things in the shower.   

Layering products

Some naturals slather on 7 different products in their hair in an attempt to keep it well moisturized. Yes, kinky hair is naturally dry, because the oils from our scalp have trouble traveling down the length of our hair due to all of its coils and bends. However, it doesn’t need 7 products either. Slathering on all those products just prolongs your styling session and extends the time it takes for your hair to dry. Also, all those products are more likely to lead to buildup. You really only need 2 or 3 products-a leave in or moisturizer that contains water as one of the first three ingredients, a styler and an oil or butter to seal in the moisture and prevent it from dissipating from your hair. That’s it. To avoid having to re-wet hair that has long since dried during a styling session, try to find products that are heavy enough to keep it moisturized so you don’t have to use multiple products in one sitting.

All Day (or overnight) Deep Conditioning 

There is a school of thought in the natural community where some people believe that deep conditioners are a waste of money altogether, but I’m not one of them. My hair certainly notices when I’ve gone too long without a deep treatment. However, I don’t believe in doing it for longer than 30 minutes either. The ingredients in many deep conditioners are designed to work within the first 5 or 10 minutes. Leaving it on your hair for another 8 hours during the day or overnight isn’t going to make it do anything extra. Personally, walking around with conditioner dripping from my neck or having my damp conditioning cap get my pillows wet would irritate me. Once the 30 odd minutes are up, my deep treatment gets rinsed out of my hair and I move on.

Not mentioned in the above link but another thing I refuse to do is:

Wash in twists or braids 

Some women wash their hair while in twists or braids to avoid having their hair retangle during the process, but I personally don’t see the point. I tried it one time early on in my journey and the 6 twists I had in my hair kept unraveling during the wash, which meant that I had to keep stopping to retwist them which only added to the time I spent washing it. Utter fail. Plus, my hair didn’t feel all that clean that time either. The conditioner and/or shampoo isn’t able to get to the entire length of your hair while it’s braided or twisted. Other naturals will twist or braid their hair up into 4, 6 or 8 twists or plaits, then undo the twist or braid, wash the section, retwist or rebraid, then move on to the next section. It’s time-consuming just reading about it. Imagine actually doing it. Personally, I found that as my hair got to shoulder length stretched that it wasn’t possible to continue washing it loose, as I had been. My hair retangled too much and I got too many single strand knots to my liking that way. So I had to start washing it in sections. I part my hair into four sections, secure them with duckbill clips, then wash each section before moving on to the next. I do not twist or braid in the shower at all. For some, what I do sounds time consuming but I have to wash my hair this way or else I won’t retain length. It is what it is.  

What I will do is:

Finger-detangle  

This is the only part in the above link that I don’t agree with. Since my hair is very fine and fragile, it’s easy for it to sustain breakage with combs and brushes alone. I’m not the most patient person so it’s only too easy for me to take out tangles by ripping out my hair with a comb when I’m rushing. Which isn’t the business when you want to retain length. I actually don’t use brushes at all now since they tend to snap my hair. However, I haven’t given up combs entirely. I haven’t gotten to the point where I’m able to find all tangles with my fingers and I don’t usually have the time it would require to do finger detangling thoroughly, so what I do is I finger detangle first, then follow up with a comb. Detangling both ways ensures I detangle as thoroughly as possible.    

For those that have the time to spend an entire day on their hair, more power to them. For me, one of the reasons why I went natural was so that I could avoid sitting in a salon for most of the day getting my hair done because they overbooked and the stylist had to tend to three other people’s heads before even touching mine. Doing the same thing while natural, albeit in the comfort of my own home, would kind of defeat the purpose of why I ditched chemicals in the first place.

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